Saturday, February 1, 2014

corvusprince:

i like queer theory as far as it—is affirming. you exist. not just in living but in text, and these words help to—explain what you are going through, not explain for you, but help you explore who you are, because this is something that should be explored

but i don’t ever want to touch the parts of academia where queer people’s lives are invalidated through theory, where theory is used to say “no, you’re not doing queer right, look at what i learned at uni”

i feel very strongly that it should support queer people’s experiences and be a place where discussion is encouraged, where you get to talk about the one thing that’s so often shoved into the closet because no one wants to recognize that it, and you, exist. and that you are important, too. i want queer academia to be a place where queerness is recognized, and where queer people don’t have to stay in the closet.

i feel like in the public school system, it’s never spoken of. 

my 10th grade english teacher taught a separate peace to her sophomores some years. you can bet she wasn’t able to talk too much about its homoerotic subtext. that isn’t acceptable. that’s something you put in the closet. 

i want queer academia to be this process of getting out of that closet, of getting to talk about queer readings of works and to be able to do so outside of social media spaces, outside of casual blogging. i want to see these queer interpretations in formal essays, because they matter. they’re just that important.

want to talk about a separate peace being queer? talk about it. this space is okay. couldn’t do it in high school, none of your teachers would even think about seeing it like that? here is a space where your words and your queer ideas are encouraged.

that is what i want queer academia to be.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Queer theory is attractive to me because it offers an explanation of identity that does not necessarily require previous identities be discarded as less “real” or authentic. This potential is important for bisexuals, many of whom come to bisexuality from lesbian, gay or straight identities, and may change identity again later in life. If change is destigmatized, even seen as revolutionary, then the stereotypical charge that bisexuals are untrustworthy because they change can be refuted without having to reject change as bad. Margaret Robinson, “Bisexuality and the Seduction by the Uncertain” (course paper, University of Toronto, 2002) You can follow her on twitter at @The_Moogie.  (via bisexualftw)

(Source: margaretrobinson.com)

Wednesday, August 22, 2012
I think that for monosexuals , they may tend to view bisexuality as like ‘having two monosexualities’ hence they imagine a bi person can never be content with just one other person. says LintLass, a very smart and thoughtful bisexual person (via bialogue-group)
Friday, August 17, 2012 Sunday, March 25, 2012

We are tired of being analyzed, defined and represented by people other than ourselves, or worse yet, not considered at all. We are frustrated by the imposed isolation and invisibility that comes from being told or expected to choose either a homosexual or heterosexual identity.

Monosexuality is a heterosexist dictate used to oppress homosexuals and to negate the validity of bisexuality.

Bisexuality is a whole, fluid identity. Do not assume that bisexuality is binary or duogamous in nature: that we have “two” sides or that we must be involved simultaneously with both genders to be fulfilled human beings. In fact, don’t assume that there are only two genders. Do not mistake our fluidity for confusion, irresponsibility, or an inability to commit. Do not equate promiscuity, infidelity, or unsafe sexual behavior with bisexuality. Those are human traits that cross all sexual orientations. Nothing should be assumed about anyone’s sexuality, including your own.

We are angered by those who refuse to accept our existence; our issues; our contributions; our alliances; our voice. It is time for the bisexual voice to be heard.

Bisexual Manifesto (1990) historic declaration about what it means to be bisexual as defined by members of the bisexual community themselves from the magazine Anything That Moves, a literary, journalistic, and topical magazine published in the USA from 1990 to 2002. (via bialogue-group)
Friday, February 24, 2012
24hoursremain:

bialogue-group:

Real etymology of “Bisexual”. Surprise! Actually has nothing to do with 50%/50%, hook-ups or cheaters.

Always reblog for the “but bi means two” crowd… it does indeed, but not for the reason you think!

24hoursremain:

bialogue-group:

Real etymology of Bisexual. Surprise! Actually has nothing to do with 50%/50%, hook-ups or cheaters.

Always reblog for the “but bi means two” crowd… it does indeed, but not for the reason you think!

Monday, February 13, 2012

We are tired of being analyzed, defined and represented by people other than ourselves, or worse yet, not considered at all. We are frustrated by the imposed isolation and invisibility that comes from being told or expected to choose either a homosexual or heterosexual identity.

Monosexuality is a heterosexist dictate used to oppress homosexuals and to negate the validity of bisexuality.

Bisexuality is a whole, fluid identity. Do not assume that bisexuality is binary or duogamous in nature: that we have “two” sides or that we must be involved simultaneously with both genders to be fulfilled human beings. In fact, don’t assume that there are only two genders. Do not mistake our fluidity for confusion, irresponsibility, or an inability to commit. Do not equate promiscuity, infidelity, or unsafe sexual behavior with bisexuality. Those are human traits that cross all sexual orientations. Nothing should be assumed about anyone’s sexuality, including your own.

We are angered by those who refuse to accept our existence; our issues; our contributions; our alliances; our voice. It is time for the bisexual voice to be heard.

Bisexual Manifesto (1990) historic declaration about what it means to be bisexual as defined by members of the bisexual community themselves from the magazine Anything That Moves, a literary, journalistic, and topical magazine published in the USA from 1990 to 2002. (via bialogue-group)
Tuesday, January 17, 2012