Friday, February 28, 2014
That’s the thing: Discrimination isn’t a thunderbolt, it isn’t an abrupt slap in the face. It’s the slow drumbeat of being underappreciated, feeling uncomfortable and encountering roadblocks along the path to success. These subtle distinctions help make women feel out of place. Meg Urry, Washington Post (via fluidfyre)
Monday, December 17, 2012
thisisthinprivilege:

(rebloggable by request)

thisisthinprivilege:

(rebloggable by request)

Thursday, August 9, 2012

onionhighonionandrenown:

youngbadmanbrown:

“These incidents may appear small, banal and trivial, but we’re beginning to find they assail the mental health of recipients.” 

-Sue et. al , 2007


If white people would even admit any of the stuff on this list was racist my life would be easier. 

http://www.olc.edu/~jolson/socialwork/OnlineLibrary/microaggression%20article.pdf

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/02/microaggression.aspx

I remember a story my mom used to tell about when she went to work for an American Indian (apparently that’s what this particular group of folks liked being called) health organization.  The subject of privilege came up, and she did bring up the don’t-really-see-people-as-being-different-races thing.

And — this made a big impression on her — her boss, a reservation-raised Paiute Indian, said: Well, of course you don’t.  You’re white.

(Source: youngbadmangone)

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 Tuesday, July 31, 2012 Monday, July 2, 2012 Saturday, June 23, 2012

Discrimination hurts us all. But neither the straight nor the gay sides seem to feel that way.

I hear it when, while joking about what a terrible gay I am because I’ve never seen Rocky Horror, a lesbian friend chips in with “No, you’re a terrible gay because you have a boyfriend.” I hear it when my brother, after a night of drinking in which we both flirt with the same woman, says he’ll make me an omelet “only if you promise never to fake-lesbian cock-block me ever again.”

My Bisexual Guilt, Persephone Magazine (2012)
Friday, June 1, 2012

So many people accept gays and lesbians and completely disbelieve in bisexuality.

That sentence right there, has caused me and my friends so much grief.

taralys (via bisexualftw)
Friday, April 20, 2012 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Saturday, April 7, 2012 Saturday, March 31, 2012
prolongedeyecontact:


SYSTEMS OF INEQUALITY: CRIMINAL JUSTICE
This diagram illustrates how overpolicing and profiling of low income people and of trans and gender non-conforming people intersect, producing a far higher risk than average of imprisonment, police harassment, and violence for low income trans people.
criminalization of poor and homeless people
Subject to profiling and harassment; excessive police presence in poor communities; increased exposure to police
Charged with survival crimes (sex work, drugs, theft, etc.) due to lack of access to gainful employment or education
Charged with “Quality of Life” crimes like sleeping outside, turnstile jumping, loitering, etc. due to lack of resources (housing, money)
criminalization of trans people
False arrest for using the “wrong” bathroom
False arrest for lack of proper documents (by INS, police, etc.)
Trans women are often falsely arrested for soliciting just for being transgender
Low-income trans people are exposed to arrests, police harassment, incarceration and violence far more than the average person
Trans people suffer additional gender-related harms while in custody of the criminal justice system
Isolated and/or subjected to increased sexual violence, harassment, and abuse at the hands of prisoners and correctional facility staff.
Gender-segregated arrest procedures (searches, holding cells, policies and procedures, etc.) do not accommodate trans people. Low-income trans-people are especially targeted due to lack of access to health care that would help them “pass” as non-trans people, as well as surgical procedures, and are commonly misclassified by arresting officers as “male” or “female” based on their appearance or whether they’ve had genital surgery.
Denied access to hormones and other trans-specific health care while incarcerated. Forced to change gendered characteristics of appearance in prison (made to cut hair, give up prosthetic, clothing). This results in mental anguish and increased exposure to harassment and violence because appearance may conform even less to gender identity.

This chart could be even more intersectional (race, PWD, etc), but I think it’s a good starting point for illustrating something that I’ve been trying to articulate in the reproductive justice movement, or the cis feminist prochoice movement specifically. Think about a hypothetical person who is working class/homeless, a person of color, a person with disabilities, non-heterosexual, and trans*. Now take this person and think about how their identity location functions in society, particularly with the police, prison industrial complex, and the healthcare system [esp. given that insurance is often tied to employment, something many trans* people lack or can be fired if they’re outed]. Now tell me that the criminalization of abortion and the defunding of social services like Planned Parenthood [they are especially important to low-come people/poc] aren’t matters of urgency for the trans* community. This insistence that we be excluded from life and death conversations is the product of willful bigotry and it’s fucking deadly.

prolongedeyecontact:

SYSTEMS OF INEQUALITY: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

This diagram illustrates how overpolicing and profiling of low income people and of trans and gender non-conforming people intersect, producing a far higher risk than average of imprisonment, police harassment, and violence for low income trans people.

criminalization of poor and homeless people

  • Subject to profiling and harassment; excessive police presence in poor communities; increased exposure to police
  • Charged with survival crimes (sex work, drugs, theft, etc.) due to lack of access to gainful employment or education
  • Charged with “Quality of Life” crimes like sleeping outside, turnstile jumping, loitering, etc. due to lack of resources (housing, money)

criminalization of trans people

  • False arrest for using the “wrong” bathroom
  • False arrest for lack of proper documents (by INS, police, etc.)
  • Trans women are often falsely arrested for soliciting just for being transgender

Low-income trans people are exposed to arrests, police harassment, incarceration and violence far more than the average person

Trans people suffer additional gender-related harms while in custody of the criminal justice system

  • Isolated and/or subjected to increased sexual violence, harassment, and abuse at the hands of prisoners and correctional facility staff.
  • Gender-segregated arrest procedures (searches, holding cells, policies and procedures, etc.) do not accommodate trans people. Low-income trans-people are especially targeted due to lack of access to health care that would help them “pass” as non-trans people, as well as surgical procedures, and are commonly misclassified by arresting officers as “male” or “female” based on their appearance or whether they’ve had genital surgery.
  • Denied access to hormones and other trans-specific health care while incarcerated. Forced to change gendered characteristics of appearance in prison (made to cut hair, give up prosthetic, clothing). This results in mental anguish and increased exposure to harassment and violence because appearance may conform even less to gender identity.

This chart could be even more intersectional (race, PWD, etc), but I think it’s a good starting point for illustrating something that I’ve been trying to articulate in the reproductive justice movement, or the cis feminist prochoice movement specifically. Think about a hypothetical person who is working class/homeless, a person of color, a person with disabilities, non-heterosexual, and trans*. Now take this person and think about how their identity location functions in society, particularly with the police, prison industrial complex, and the healthcare system [esp. given that insurance is often tied to employment, something many trans* people lack or can be fired if they’re outed]. Now tell me that the criminalization of abortion and the defunding of social services like Planned Parenthood [they are especially important to low-come people/poc] aren’t matters of urgency for the trans* community. This insistence that we be excluded from life and death conversations is the product of willful bigotry and it’s fucking deadly.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 Monday, January 30, 2012