Saturday, April 12, 2014

BULLYING TRIGGER WARNING

sheeranpixie:

hydracorn:

selfharmer-problems:

lostprinceofasgard:

ishipthat:

shanwaters:

archiescrush:

queersublimeoutcast:

burrenbari:

fadeintocase:

helioscentrifuge:

Hey. Don’t just scroll past. Come back and watch this. You need it more than you know.

holy shit.

the time out of your day to watch this will not be wasted, I assure you.

By about the 2:00 I was sobbing.

I scrolled halfway past and then thought “okay i’ll see what it’s about”

Definitely the correct choice. Watch it.

They. Were. Wrong.

oh god the actual tears on my face

my english teacher showed us this in class the other day. When it was over, I looked around to see reactions. Half the class had these awkward, slightly uncomfortable grins, and half were staring frozen at the screen. You could really tell who this affected.

Oh my… You ALL need to watch this. Very little affects me the way this video did: literally shivers and tears. Please give this a watch.

It’s back!

Please watch this… I’m sobbing rn. It’s just beautiful, you won’t regret it.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

I am a Person that has been Bullied.

the-people-of:

Does this statement apply to you? Reblog it and be counted. More information here.

(Source: mr-cappadocia)

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

cmacmac:

cmacmac:

This is my comic Blame. It’s taken me a VERY long time to create this (mentally not physically. Physically it only took me a little over a week to draw).

Just reblogging this because no one gets to see it when it’s buried in my blog, and the whole point of the comic was to make me tell people.

Thursday, October 17, 2013
bisexual-community:

I am #Bisexual and I am against bullying. #SpiritDay 10/17/2013! 

bisexual-community:

I am #Bisexual and I am against bullying. #SpiritDay 10/17/2013! 

Saturday, December 8, 2012
The reason “It Gets Better” caught on with politicians and celebrities is because it’s great PR and it requires absolutely NOTHING from them in the way of real action.

someone on datalounge who I cannot quite disagree with (via aliapenny)

I just need that entire comment on my blog:

It’s just a bullshit PR campaign, nothing more. Telling kids to put up with bullying until they leave school is not constructive advice. It’s cruel. School boards, school administrators, teachers, etc., need to have zero tolerance policy for bullying. It’s not uncommon for teachers to bully unpopular kids themselves. That’s where the changes need to be made. But that requires action, and it requires standing up to conservatives who fight anti-bullying campaigns tooth and nail (often claiming that bullying gay people is a christian right). The reason “It Gets Better” caught on with politicians and celebrities is because it’s great PR and it requires absolutely NOTHING from them in the way of real action.

It’s cruelty to tell a kid to tolerate bullying. And to whom is this campaign even directed? The fat gay kids that Savage makes fun of himself? It’s a campaign aimed at good looking white boys with great bodies and upper middle class families. Yes, THEY will do better once they start hitting the gay bars. But for most average looking kids from working class families, they will find a gay community that’s often very much like High School, with cliques and teasing and rejection. Gay kids need to get support from society, and the kids that need that most are the kids that Savage himself would mock and demonize; kids of color, working class and poor kids, fat kids, kids with acne, and kids who are otherwise marginalized in society AND in our community.

Even when you look at the videos on YouTube, you see politicians who’ve come out against marriage equality, sports teams that would never accept a gay person in their ranks, and celebrities who just want some good press. The gay kids who participate are often great looking white boys, who you know will be accepted in the gay community, and are already leading charmed lives. It’s a campaign for the people Savage likes…sexy white male teenagers with athletic bodies who will be greeted with open arms.

I’ll take the campaign seriously when Savage speaks out on behalf of marginalized gay kids, and criticizes the gay community for iots racism and other prejudices. But he’s the biggest bigot and bully of the bunch, and that’s been proven from his many years as a “columnist.” I often couldn’t believe how conservative, prejudiced, and intolerant he was in those columns.”

(via davyjonesing)

Also trans people. 

Dan Savage doesn’t care about the T, and he’s been actively, grossly cissexist on many distinct occasions. 

(via misterstibbons)

Not to mention asexuals, women, lower-class people, etc.
Let’s face it kids, Dan Savage is the most hypocritical douchebag in the queer rights movement.

But yes I agree with everything that has been posted above. 

(via daelhorhota)

don’t forget that he thinks bisexuals in general need to “make up their mind” and that male bisexuals are essentially unicorns

(via freakingdork)

I once had an extended argument over when he was glitter-bombed because he’s a huge hypocritical transphobe. You can’t claim to be a trans* ally and then hurl transphobic slurs at your enemies. There’s no complicit-by-ignorance-and-stupidity argument to be made there - that’s just straight up transphobia. He is not an ‘activist.’ He is making a great living by essentially capitalizing on the intersection of his hegemonic identities and a burgeoning pinkwashed economy.

(via trungles)

liking all the commentary here, and yeah that’s always bugged me about the “it gets better” campaign; it should be made better for kids NOW, not just waiting for them to get older and for their life to stop sucking

(via pentapod-monster)

Monday, July 2, 2012 Tuesday, June 19, 2012
kaelor:

flipfloppinwheel:

reblogged from midshot

I really like how they don’t clarify which of the boys in the picture is gay. It’s a subtle way of undermining stereotypes at the same time.

kaelor:

flipfloppinwheel:

reblogged from midshot

I really like how they don’t clarify which of the boys in the picture is gay. It’s a subtle way of undermining stereotypes at the same time.

Sunday, June 3, 2012

A teacher in New York was teaching her class about bullying and gave them the following exercise to perform. She had the children take a piece of paper and told them to crumple it up, stomp on it and really mess it up but do not rip it. Then she had them unfold the paper, smooth it out and look at how scarred and dirty is was. She then told them to tell it they’re sorry. Now even though they said …they were sorry and tried to fix the paper, she pointed out all the scars they left behind. And that those scars will never go away no matter how hard they tried to fix it. That is what happens when a child bully’s another child, they may say they’re sorry but the scars are there forever. The looks on the faces of the children in the classroom told her the message hit home. Pass it on.

(Source: )

Sunday, May 27, 2012
When are we going to say out loud that the problem with bullying in our schools isn’t going to go away because America, itself, is a bully—whether nationally or internationally; because Americans, en large, believe bullying is normal and natural; because Americans, mainly, think bullying is an effective gender policing/sexual orientation policing tool? When are we going to keep that shit real?

Son of Baldwin (via sonofbaldwin)

*United States but yes.

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

I work in the school system as a sign language interpreter. One thing about my job is that interpreters are pretty much invisible, in that the kids forget we’re there. So we see things that teachers don’t see. I’ve seen that even kids who seem to have plenty of friends may be bullied horribly behind the teacher’s back. And that these kids are not likely to say anything for fear of making it worse.

I want to homeschool my child for a number of reasons. When I express this wish to other adults, I am often met with disapproval. I am told that “kids need to experience bullying, or they won’t learn how to deal with it.” Let me tell you something. The kids who face bullying every day don’t know how to deal with it. There is no way to deal with it. Anyone who says otherwise has never faced extreme bullying. I wouldn’t expect an adult to put up with that kind of treatment from another human being, so why would I expect it from my child? From any child?

Yes, I think that the United States has some messed up ideas about bullying.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012 Friday, April 20, 2012 Friday, April 6, 2012
knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:
What Can I Do to Make My
School Safe for LGBT Youth?



Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:
If you’re a student:
Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.
If you’re a teacher:
Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.
If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:
Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.
If you’re a parent:
Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.
(image from University of New Mexico)

knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:

What Can I Do to Make My

School Safe for LGBT Youth?

Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:

If you’re a student:

  • Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
  • Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
  • Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
  • Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
  • Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.

If you’re a teacher:

  • Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
  • Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
  • Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
  • Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
  • Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.

If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:

  • Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
  • Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
  • Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
  • Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
  • Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.

If you’re a parent:

  • Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
  • Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
  • Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
  • Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
  • Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.

(image from University of New Mexico)

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Followers, i need something from you.

love-gets-better-in-time:

There is a school that is currently BANNING the Day of Silence and the use of any LGBTQ words in announcements. In case you were wondering, this is indeed illegal.

Stop this by singing the petition here!

Over and over again in “Bully,” we see adults who feel bureaucratically paralyzed, who look the other way, who are unwilling to make judgments between perpetrators and victims, or who actively condone vicious and sadistic behavior as the Darwinian natural order of childhood. In many cases you can feel considerable sympathy for these people. After all, the schools must try to educate bullies as well as victims (and the latter often turn into the former), the distinction between normal horseplay and bullying can be hard to parse, and no adult can protect a child from all possible harm.

Declaring that underage kids can’t even see this film without a grown-up to hold their hands, however, falls somewhere near the nastier end of that spectrum of indecision. With the stated goal of not offending anybody, the MPAA has essentially told the bullied teens in the movie and outside it — gay and lesbian kids, autistic kids, disabled kids, fat kids and nerds and Goths and plain old weird kids who don’t fit in — that their very existence is too upsetting for normal kids to see, and they should crawl back under their rocks.

Why the MPAA doesn’t want your kid to see “Bully” - Salon.com (via ladyatheist)
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
If [bullying a developer is] what ‘fans’ do, we don’t want fans like that. Being passionate about something does not give someone a license to engage in harassment, stalking, uttering threats, or invading someone’s privacy, particularly when the person they’re harassing is a creator of the thing these people purportedly love.

BioWare’s Stanley Woo, in support of BioWare writer Jennifer Hepler, who has been threatened and harrassed and generally treated like shit by dude gamers for saying something they didn’t like six years ago.

It’s really sad that things like this need to be said.

(via kiriamaya)