Thursday, April 26, 2012

shymoth:

tyriantyranny:

  • polyamory isnt wrong
  1. polyamory isnt wrong

polyamory isnt wrong

polyamory isnt wrong

polyamory isnt wrong

things that are wrong:

  • folks getting in a dither about other beings lifestyles
  • folks thinking any way of loving someone with their consent is wrong
Friday, April 6, 2012
knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:
What Can I Do to Make My
School Safe for LGBT Youth?



Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:
If you’re a student:
Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.
If you’re a teacher:
Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.
If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:
Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.
If you’re a parent:
Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.
(image from University of New Mexico)

knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:

What Can I Do to Make My

School Safe for LGBT Youth?

Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:

If you’re a student:

  • Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
  • Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
  • Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
  • Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
  • Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.

If you’re a teacher:

  • Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
  • Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
  • Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
  • Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
  • Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.

If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:

  • Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
  • Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
  • Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
  • Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
  • Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.

If you’re a parent:

  • Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
  • Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
  • Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
  • Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
  • Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.

(image from University of New Mexico)

Saturday, March 3, 2012

lgbtlaughs:

My mom visited a daycare center for her work recently and this is what happened. 

There was this little 4 year old boy that smiled at her the second he saw her. When my mom smiled back, his face was beaming as if he couldn’t believe that she was looking at him with a smile. He went to play only to come back a few moments later. He was now wearing a pink dress and high heels. Again he looked up at my mom with a huge smile. My mom smiled back and said “those are nice flowers on your dress.” The kid was so happy he started twirling around my mom. The more he saw that my mom was ok with him the more he twirled and the more natural his movements became. She could see on his face how happy it made him to be able to be himself in front of her.

[via oursimpleuniverse]