Thursday, October 24, 2013
What the hell does a woman’s body possess that makes it a woman’s body? What does it NEED to have to be female. Did you immediately think of breasts, ovaries, vaginas? Gross. Think about that for more than two minutes and you’ll see why it’s gross. Still don’t get it? Well then go down to the nearest breast cancer walk and tell every single woman with a double mastectomy she’s not a woman. When you’re done with that, go down to your local hospital, ask the nurse where the OR is, and wait outside until you can find a woman fresh out of her hysterectomy surgery, and tell her the news. Yeah, that sounds evil, doesn’t it? Well it’s basically what you’re doing when you’re policing trans women’s bodies. You’re telling all women what they have to have on/in their bodies to be a woman. Which, obviously, is totally gross. Guest Post: Transmisogyny is Misogyny Against All Women « Tranarchism
Monday, September 16, 2013
I am a trans woman. My sisters are trans women. We are not secrets. We are not shameful. We are worthy of respect, desire, and love. As there are many kinds of women, there are many kinds of men, and many men desire many kinds of women, trans women are amongst these women. And let’s be clear: Trans women are women.

A quote from a piece I wrote today about the shaming of men who desire and date trans women, and how this stigma only further demeans trans women.

Yes, this is a direct response to the commentary following the foolishness surrounding hip hop DJ Mister Cee.

(via janetmock)

Sunday, September 15, 2013

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

jemeryl:

pansycub:

bookishboi:

Fallon Fox is the world’s first trans MMA fighter. Deal with it.

[Read Her Story Here.]

Yay :D

*o*

SO MUCH AWESOME :D

TW for transmisogyny in the link. I mean, the article is pretty positive, but the description of some of the stuff she faces is pretty awful.

On Socialization Arguments against Trans people

tonidorsay:

So, earlier today, in a relatively short period of time, I watched someone unironically use the argument that trans women are not women because they were socialized as men, and that as such, they cannot ever be anything other than men.

They also applied it to trans men, indirectly.

Specifically, these were the uses of the concept:

You cannot transition out of your socialization, just like you cant transition into male privilege.

and

Your socialization dictates that what you say goes, men dominate, and push their way into female spaces.

Now, most trans folk tend to fall for these arguments.  They are, for the most part, still dealing with a lot of the internalized shame and stigma that is hurled at them, and this is a fairly common, very old argument that presupposes, at its core, that one cannot change because of their socialization.

Indeed, in the second example, that’s even made explicit.

Now here’s the problem:

A woman said those things.  Well, actually, I say a woman because she claims to be a woman, but as I’ve seen no evidence of it, I’m merely giving her the basic dignity to which she is entitled by respecting that claim of hers — and I’ll note I’m doing so despite being called a man, white, and a few others choice things, all of which are false.

Which I realize is a bit of a derail from the point, but is one of those little jabs that I occasionally have to get in with a bit of glee.

In any case, as a woman, she was socialized as a woman. She was socialized that if I am a man, she is supposed to shut the hell up and not argue with me.  She was socialized to not make waves, to be more interested in finding a good man than living a life that is her own construction.  She was socialized to see her job as being a woman and as being a mother, and she was socialized to look for the prince.

Yet here she is not doing those things.

Here she is actively defying the very socialization that she is saying that one cannot defy.

In feminist discourse, what she’s arguing is that Structure (in this case, patriarchy) is so powerful that it overrides the ability of a trans person to have Agency, while she, in turn, retains that Agency for herself and is able to actively use it to resist the power of Structure.

WHen I pointed this out to her earlier, I was informed of several falsehoods by her and another person about myself, which essentially amounted to them deciding for me what my state of being is — that is, not affording me the basic core precept of dignity, and, instead, acting in a manner that is directly oppressive and that seeks to decide, for me, regardless of any other reality outside their own narrow viewpoint, that I am what they say I am.

Now, forgive me, but I’m trying really hard to think of a time when someone else gets to decide for you what you are that doesn’t involve violating your human rights.

I’m sure if I think on it long enough I’ll come up with a really complicated case.

This, however, isn’t it.

When you see radfems, in specific, using that argument, remember that they are, themselves, going against the very socialization that they are speaking about, and if they can go against, then there has to be some other reason for someone else not be able to do so, unless, of course, they are trying to police the lives of other people.

When you see conservatives doing it, remind them that socialization means they wouldn’t be speaking out themselves, because we in america are socialized to hold up as heroes those who undergo the arduous task of self empowerment and become whole persons — we hold people who rise the fullness of their potential as architects of the future.

It probably won’t work, but it gives you a head start.

In any case, here’s the simple truth: the way people are socialized does have an impact on how they live their lives and it does influence their decisions and their experiences.  It doesn’t make those decisions for you, and it cannot stop you from being yourself if you are strong enough — if you have the personal Agency enough — to defy it.

The act of Transition — an act that trans people have to undertake against tremendous odds and that typically has enormous personal, emotional, and spiritual costs — is an act of Agency, an effort that, in and of itself, is absolutely concomitant with the act of overcoming the very socialization that they speak of.

In practice, I point out that transition is only about 10 to 20% physical.  And that part takes time — a lot of time, really, but most folks with means concentrate on the first three years or so.

The rest of it, and the part that is the hardest, is the social part, and a major reason that it is so damned hard is stuff like this spcialization argument, and the real, measurable  tangible harm that comes from being told you are not a woman, you are not a man, you just have a mental illness and related aggressive, violent statements made for the express purpose of causing emotional and mental harm to another person.

The person who said those things is a serial abuser. Abuse was their response to me when I pointed out the problem — which isn’t hard to figure out, really, given that it is about the least feminist statement one can make — and abuse is what they hurl at other trans people.

I’m sharing this so that the next time you see someone use the socialization argument against anyone, you can point out to them the core flaw there: they are part of the same system that socializes themselves.

Thursday, September 12, 2013
He now identifies as a journalist, but was born naked, hairless, and unable to control his bowels. What I think when I read mainstream coverage of trans people (via amydentata)
Monday, September 2, 2013

ritchandfamous:

You’ll call Ben Haggerty “Macklemore” and Stefani Germanotta “Lady Gaga”, but you won’t call Chelsea Manning “Chelsea Manning”, because that’s just too weird I guess.

Sunday, September 1, 2013

helloradness:

"cis" is not a slur

"cis" is not an insult

"cis" is an incredibly important word that eliminates the "otherness" of trans* identities, and makes cisgender identities less of a default

(Source: gaydicks420)

Tuesday, June 11, 2013
bialogue-group:

Know Your Bisexual History: UNITY: Keep the “T” in LGBT Support a Trans-inclusive ENDA This is a popular BiNet USA Bisexual & Trans* Activist Poster from 2007.  On September 27th 2007 a weakened Lesbian/Gay anti-discrimination Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) supported by major Gay/Lesbian Groups that did not include protections for gender identity and contained exemptions concerning employer dress codes was proposed in the US House of Representatives. Within 24 Hours then BiNet USA President Wendy Curry had completely withdrawn the support of the USA’s biggest national Bisexual/Non-monosexual organization.  She explained this decision in the piece published on September 28th 2007 “No ENDA without ‘T’” in which she explains:




The trans community is part of the bi “net”. Unlike other national groups, we will not discard “inconvenient” parts of our community in order to win a political victory. Likewise, we would never consider tossing out the polyamourous, the monogamous, the pagan, or the christians; our diversity makes us strong.Since the beginning of our organization, the trans community has been our closest ally. They were excluded from the same organizations as the bisexual community. We fought along side each other to forge a LGBT community. We have benefited from their hard work (as they us). Now is not the time to look the other way.The people who wish to “shave off” gender identity and the same people who, when necessary, will remove bisexuals from marriage, military, or any other civil rights actions. We’re too complicated. We distract from the “core” issue. Back in the 90’s, BiNet USA’s membership body voted via consensus to direct board members to support trans causes and stand with them - even when difficult. We are continuing the battle to this day …A wise person once said “United we stand, divided we fall”. There was no mention of when it’s “convenient”.




Want to know more? Two good place to check out are the Bi History Group on Facebook and Bisexual History on Twitter.

bialogue-group:

Know Your Bisexual History: UNITY: Keep the “T” in LGBT Support a Trans-inclusive ENDA

This is a popular BiNet USA Bisexual & Trans* Activist Poster from 2007.  On September 27th 2007 a weakened Lesbian/Gay anti-discrimination Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) supported by major Gay/Lesbian Groups that did not include protections for gender identity and contained exemptions concerning employer dress codes was proposed in the US House of Representatives.

Within 24 Hours then BiNet USA President Wendy Curry had completely withdrawn the support of the USA’s biggest national Bisexual/Non-monosexual organization.  She explained this decision in the piece published on September 28th 2007 No ENDA without ‘T’ in which she explains:

The trans community is part of the bi “net”. Unlike other national groups, we will not discard “inconvenient” parts of our community in order to win a political victory. Likewise, we would never consider tossing out the polyamourous, the monogamous, the pagan, or the christians; our diversity makes us strong.

Since the beginning of our organization, the trans community has been our closest ally. They were excluded from the same organizations as the bisexual community. We fought along side each other to forge a LGBT community. We have benefited from their hard work (as they us). Now is not the time to look the other way.

The people who wish to “shave off” gender identity and the same people who, when necessary, will remove bisexuals from marriage, military, or any other civil rights actions. We’re too complicated. We distract from the “core” issue.

Back in the 90’s, BiNet USA’s membership body voted via consensus to direct board members to support trans causes and stand with them - even when difficult. We are continuing the battle to this day …

A wise person once said “United we stand, divided we fall”. There was no mention of when it’s “convenient”.

Want to know more? Two good place to check out are the Bi History Group on Facebook and Bisexual History on Twitter.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

livelaughawesome:

monotremata:

carniccity:

monotremata:

The long awaited.. PRINCE AND THE PRINCESS…

My final project for my book arts class. Hope you enjoy ;o;

not to be a nitpicker but they still called the “prince” a ‘she’.

very fairy tale, as if there were no medieval context what-so-ever

-shrug-

still enjoyed it.

Ahhh sorry it isn’t really clear but Emilia still identifies as female!! Haha the title is a little misleading *__* Both end up as princesses! The title is based off the prince and the pauper and edmund is a prince for most of the story. I’m open to other suggestions for the title though! * v *

YES YES YES ALL OFTHIS

Monday, February 18, 2013 Saturday, February 16, 2013
barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass
She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass

  • She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
  • She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
  • While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
  • She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
  • She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

Friday, February 15, 2013

I’m trying to make a point to a friend. Reblog this if you’d be okay with your child coming up to you and saying “I think I was born as the wrong gender.”

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Back in grad school I did a talk on bisexuality with the GLBT student organization. One of the gay undergraduates said to me, “I think that when homosexuality is fully accepted, there will be no bisexuals.” And I said “I think when homosexuality is fully accepted, there will be more bisexuals than anything else.” I don’t know if that’s precisely true, but I do know that when someone tells me what their internal experience is, I believe them. When someone tells me they’re gay or lesbian, I believe them. When someone says they’re attracted to people without reference to gender, I believe them. When someone says they’re not interested in sex with anyone, I believe them. And I don’t think it takes a PhD in sex to recognize that each individual is THE ONE AND ONLY EXPERT on that individual’s sexuality. Asexuality is just another variation on human sexuality. We’re all made of the same parts, just organized in different ways. And if somebody says that’s their internal experience, well they’re the only ones who knows that. But why would gay people deny the existence of bisexuality, or fear and shun asexuals? Another experience from grad school: I had my first formal training about trans* stuff. We were talking about discrimination and hate crimes, and I asked, “Why does anyone feel threatened by transpeople? Why would anyone waste energy hating someone who isn’t doing anything to hurt anyone else?” (This was before the moral foundations research.) And my supervisor said, “How do you feel about your gender?” I thought about it for a minute and said, “Pretty good!” And she said, “People who hate trans people often don’t feel pretty good about their gender. Seeing someone else living their gender according to their own rules feels threatening because it means the rules about gender may not be worth following.” I do wonder how much of that dynamic goes into the fear and shunning that some gay folks express about bisexuals and asexuals. I wonder if they feel like there isn’t room in the tent for such diversity, when they’ve had to fight so hard for something as relatively simple (in its easy analogy with heterosexuality) as homosexual relationships. I can understand it, if that’s what’s going on. But I’m really, really ready for the world to move past that. the dirty normal (via panickyintheuk)
Thursday, October 18, 2012